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Group coaching supervision

Join other coaches for group supervision, share insights, challenges and good practice

Introducing group coaching supervision

Our group coaching supervision creates ‘super’ vision, a meta-perspective on day-to-day coaching practice. It is an opportunity for internal coaches to step away from ‘business as usual’. The group discussions can shine a new light or lens upon the situation. Through reflection and raised awareness, a new focus and different future actions often emerge.

Who is the group supervision for?

It is for internal coaches who are recognised within the organisation. The coaching supervision meetings are for coaches who are either at the start of their coaching development or more experienced practitioners.

Group sessions are run virtually for up to 6 internal coaches and facilitated by the same supervisor each time. The supervision is usually for two hours and the number of sessions are agreed upfront and then set up over the coming year.

Supervision can create valuable learning for any coach at any stage of their development. Even coaches who are working more informally within their teams or with their peers, joining a supervision group session can enhance their coaching skills and confidence too.

One of the advantages of our group supervision is that it fosters diverse perspectives. Group supervision often brings together internal coaches and L&OD specialists who work in different parts of the business or who might be geographically dispersed. This adds to the diversity of the group, which in turn can deepen the quality of the group supervision conversations. The group may consist of coaches of with different levels of coaching experience too which again, can add to the richness and mix of the range of topics covered.

The benefits of group supervision

Supervision can provide coaches with a range of benefits personally and professionally. It is a safe, confidential space where there is an opportunity to:

  • Share with others and to be a part of strong, supportive community of coaching and L&OD practitioners
  • Foster a reflective practice, celebrating successes with clients and challenging thinking and assumptions that might be getting in the way of serving them well
  • Pool creative ideas, insights and approaches, increasing the quality of ongoing professional coaching development
  • Ensure that personal and professional wellbeing is maintained, and resilience is built
  • Explore the ethics and complexity of issues that can occur as an internal coach

Our approach to group coaching supervision

Central to our approach is our experience. We know, first-hand, the demands of a growing business and what it takes to set you up and run an effective coaching practice well. We understand our context from the inside-out. We believe that internal coaches also know their situation in this way too. They are earthed in it.

During our coaching supervision, we explore how coaches in complex systems can get caught in confusing relational dynamics and tricky parallel processes. Our role as skilled supervisors is to high light what is going on and bring a new or different perspective. We support internal coaches to get ‘unstuck’ and navigate their way through the intricacies of their organisation cultures.

Our supervision sessions provide an organisational forum for internal coaches. It offers a safe, confidential space to share and discuss tricky or challenging ethical issues. During supervision challenges often occur and awareness of unhelpful patterns of thinking or ways of relating may be expressed. It can throw light on blind spots. Feelings can be expressed, clearing the way for richer thinking and a recharge of energy.

The sessions can also be a way of minimising organisational risk by helping coaches maintain a professional and reflective coaching practice. It supports coaches in maintaining boundaries. It is an opportunity to work through or determine any conflicts of interest that can emerge within complex systems and to hewn up vital contracting skills needed as an internal coach.

Through our supervision approach, we value the power of different ways of knowing, intellectual, emotional and bodily awareness – encouraging coaches to access more of their creativity, safely experiment and explore personal and organisational metaphors. Our approach is also about ensuring the well-being of coaches and the encouragement of self-care and inner resourcefulness.

Group supervision ensures coaches understand a client might benefit from a different type of professional support. Identifying with the coach when and how accessing other services provided by the organisation (such as therapy counselling or medical advice) is the best option moving forward. It also highlights how to refer-on in these circumstances, with informative care and sensitivity.

Our group supervision covers the whole range of topics that contribute to the blend of ‘good’ coaching practice in organisations. It provides a rich on-going learning and reflective environment for internal coaches.

Meet our directors

Jude Elliman

Jude helps her clients to think clearly, strategically and practically. She supports her clients as they face big challenges and pressing, significant issues. Jude’s coaching approach is highly relational, organisationally savvy and results-orientated.

Work with Jude

Nick Isbister

For 26 years, Nick has been a trusted advisor to many leaders and emerging leaders. He focuses on working with senior executives, helping them negotiate the pressures they face at the top of their organisations.

Work with Nick

Meet our other coaches

‘When I think of supervision with Jude, I think of safety and challenge. She creates a trusting relationship where she both challenges me to go outside of my comfort zone, but also builds my confidence as a coach. I have learned powerful perspectives and models to use in my own coaching, and deepened my understanding of my impact. Her knowledge, perceptiveness, compassion and her sense of humour make her an extraordinary supervisor in both individual and group contexts.’

Julie Jessop
Leadership Coach

Getting creative in Executive Coaching Supervision

Creativity enhances all sorts of situations. Creative thinking often delivers sparkles of brilliance, amazing and unexpected insights. And a creative slant gives executive coaches some real advantages, helping them re-imagine situations, dream up unusual solutions, and see things very differently. Here’s how creativity in executive coaching supervision can be a real game-changer.

How to make the most of your coaching supervision sessions.

Every coach is different, and every effective coaching supervisor understands how important it is to get the practical side of things right from the start. Setting up the right context for yourself and preparing well pays enormous dividends, enhancing the quality of your sessions

Golden threads in coaching

There is power in simplicity. If you can articulate the core principles in a way that others can quickly grasp, it makes running a coaching practice so much easier.

“When I think of supervision with Jude, I think of safety and challenge. She creates a trusting relationship where she both challenges me to go outside of my comfort zone, but also builds my confidence as a coach. I have learned powerful perspectives and models to use in my own coaching, and deepened my understanding of my impact. Her knowledge, perceptiveness, compassion and her sense of humour make her an extraordinary supervisor in both individual and group contexts.”

Julie Jessop
Leadership Coach

“Supervision discussions with Jude are much more than just a meeting. Jude provides an environment where I feel safe and able to raise questions and reflect on my coaching practice. Every discussion is a stimulating and encouraging learning opportunity after which I feel enriched, stretched, and empowered to go deeper in my own coaching journey. It’s a privilege to be able to learn from the profound insights and experience Jude has gained over many years as a coaching professional.”

Ian Smith
Director, Springbrook Partnership; EMCC Accredited Coach – Senior Practitioner

Getting creative in Executive Coaching Supervision

Creativity enhances all sorts of situations. Creative thinking often delivers sparkles of brilliance, amazing and unexpected insights. And a creative slant gives executive coaches some real advantages, helping them re-imagine situations, dream up unusual solutions, and see things very differently. Here’s how creativity in executive coaching supervision can be a real game-changer.

How to choose a coaching supervisor

How will you choose the best coaching supervisor for you? Who might stand out from the crowd for you? How will you know for sure that you have found that person? Here are some ideas that may help you make this crucial decision.

Golden threads in coaching

There is power in simplicity. If you can articulate the core principles in a way that others can quickly grasp, it makes running a coaching practice so much easier.

View all articles

Introducing group coaching supervision

Our group coaching supervision creates ‘super’ vision, a meta-perspective on day-to-day coaching practice. It is an opportunity for internal coaches to step away from ‘business as usual’. The group discussions can shine a new light or lens upon the situation. Through reflection and raised awareness, a new focus and different future actions often emerge.

Who is the group supervision for?

It is for internal coaches who are recognised within the organisation. The coaching supervision meetings are for coaches who are either at the start of their coaching development or more experienced practitioners.

Group sessions are run virtually for up to 6 internal coaches and facilitated by the same supervisor each time. The supervision is usually for two hours and the number of sessions are agreed upfront and then set up over the coming year.

Supervision can create valuable learning for any coach at any stage of their development. Even coaches who are working more informally within their teams or with their peers, joining a supervision group session can enhance their coaching skills and confidence too.

One of the advantages of our group supervision is that it fosters diverse perspectives. Group supervision often brings together internal coaches and L&OD specialists who work in different parts of the business or who might be geographically dispersed. This adds to the diversity of the group, which in turn can deepen the quality of the group supervision conversations. The group may consist of coaches of with different levels of coaching experience too which again, can add to the richness and mix of the range of topics covered.

The benefits of group supervision

Supervision can provide coaches with a range of benefits personally and professionally. It is a safe, confidential space where there is an opportunity to:

  • Share with others and to be a part of strong, supportive community of coaching and L&OD practitioners
  • Foster a reflective practice, celebrating successes with clients and challenging thinking and assumptions that might be getting in the way of serving them well
  • Pool creative ideas, insights and approaches, increasing the quality of ongoing professional coaching development
  • Ensure that personal and professional wellbeing is maintained, and resilience is built
  • Explore the ethics and complexity of issues that can occur as an internal coach

Our approach to group coaching supervision

Central to our approach is our experience. We know, first-hand, the demands of a growing business and what it takes to set you up and run an effective coaching practice well. We understand our context from the inside-out. We believe that internal coaches also know their situation in this way too. They are earthed in it.

During our coaching supervision, we explore how coaches in complex systems can get caught in confusing relational dynamics and tricky parallel processes. Our role as skilled supervisors is to high light what is going on and bring a new or different perspective. We support internal coaches to get ‘unstuck’ and navigate their way through the intricacies of their organisation cultures.

Our supervision sessions provide an organisational forum for internal coaches. It offers a safe, confidential space to share and discuss tricky or challenging ethical issues. During supervision challenges often occur and awareness of unhelpful patterns of thinking or ways of relating may be expressed. It can throw light on blind spots. Feelings can be expressed, clearing the way for richer thinking and a recharge of energy.

The sessions can also be a way of minimising organisational risk by helping coaches maintain a professional and reflective coaching practice. It supports coaches in maintaining boundaries. It is an opportunity to work through or determine any conflicts of interest that can emerge within complex systems and to hewn up vital contracting skills needed as an internal coach.

Through our supervision approach, we value the power of different ways of knowing, intellectual, emotional and bodily awareness – encouraging coaches to access more of their creativity, safely experiment and explore personal and organisational metaphors. Our approach is also about ensuring the well-being of coaches and the encouragement of self-care and inner resourcefulness.

Group supervision ensures coaches understand a client might benefit from a different type of professional support. Identifying with the coach when and how accessing other services provided by the organisation (such as therapy counselling or medical advice) is the best option moving forward. It also highlights how to refer-on in these circumstances, with informative care and sensitivity.

Our group supervision covers the whole range of topics that contribute to the blend of ‘good’ coaching practice in organisations. It provides a rich on-going learning and reflective environment for internal coaches.

Meet our directors

Jude Elliman

Jude helps her clients to think clearly, strategically and practically. She supports her clients as they face big challenges and pressing, significant issues. Jude’s coaching approach is highly relational, organisationally savvy and results-orientated.

Work with Jude

Nick Isbister

For 26 years, Nick has been a trusted advisor to many leaders and emerging leaders. He focuses on working with senior executives, helping them negotiate the pressures they face at the top of their organisations.

Work with Nick

Meet our other coaches

‘When I think of supervision with Jude, I think of safety and challenge. She creates a trusting relationship where she both challenges me to go outside of my comfort zone, but also builds my confidence as a coach. I have learned powerful perspectives and models to use in my own coaching, and deepened my understanding of my impact. Her knowledge, perceptiveness, compassion and her sense of humour make her an extraordinary supervisor in both individual and group contexts.’

Julie Jessop
Leadership Coach

Getting creative in Executive Coaching Supervision

Creativity enhances all sorts of situations. Creative thinking often delivers sparkles of brilliance, amazing and unexpected insights. And a creative slant gives executive coaches some real advantages, helping them re-imagine situations, dream up unusual solutions, and see things very differently. Here’s how creativity in executive coaching supervision can be a real game-changer.

How to make the most of your coaching supervision sessions.

Every coach is different, and every effective coaching supervisor understands how important it is to get the practical side of things right from the start. Setting up the right context for yourself and preparing well pays enormous dividends, enhancing the quality of your sessions

Golden threads in coaching

There is power in simplicity. If you can articulate the core principles in a way that others can quickly grasp, it makes running a coaching practice so much easier.

“When I think of supervision with Jude, I think of safety and challenge. She creates a trusting relationship where she both challenges me to go outside of my comfort zone, but also builds my confidence as a coach. I have learned powerful perspectives and models to use in my own coaching, and deepened my understanding of my impact. Her knowledge, perceptiveness, compassion and her sense of humour make her an extraordinary supervisor in both individual and group contexts.”

Julie Jessop
Leadership Coach

“Supervision discussions with Jude are much more than just a meeting. Jude provides an environment where I feel safe and able to raise questions and reflect on my coaching practice. Every discussion is a stimulating and encouraging learning opportunity after which I feel enriched, stretched, and empowered to go deeper in my own coaching journey. It’s a privilege to be able to learn from the profound insights and experience Jude has gained over many years as a coaching professional.”

Ian Smith
Director, Springbrook Partnership; EMCC Accredited Coach – Senior Practitioner

Meet our directors

Jude Elliman

Jude helps her clients to think clearly, strategically and practically. She supports her clients as they face big challenges and pressing, significant issues. Jude’s coaching approach is highly relational, organisationally savvy and results-orientated.

Work with Jude

Nick Isbister

For 26 years, Nick has been a trusted advisor to many leaders and emerging leaders. He focuses on working with senior executives, helping them negotiate the pressures they face at the top of their organisations.

Work with Nick

Latest articles

Getting creative in Executive Coaching Supervision

Creativity enhances all sorts of situations. Creative thinking often delivers sparkles of brilliance, amazing and unexpected insights. And a creative slant gives executive coaches some real advantages, helping them re-imagine situations, dream up unusual solutions, and see things very differently. Here’s how creativity in executive coaching supervision can be a real game-changer.